Posts Tagged ‘suffering’


Of of the many distressed children at Rose Mina

The 2010 earthquake killed at least 250,000 Haitians, and forced millions to live in temporary shelter in squalid conditions. There are countless large piles of rubble and tent cities to go along with the dilapidated buildings and shacks that exist all over Port-au-Prince and other urban areas. But if it is not clear, it should be mentioned that Haiti was a deplorable place well before the 2010 earthquake; child abuse, trafficking and malnutrition was rampant as long as anyone can remember.

Note the following from a March 2008 discussion on the US State Department website: “Despite some improvements, the government’s human rights record remained poor. The following human rights problems were reported: alleged unlawful killings by Haiti National Police officers; ineffective measures to address killings by members of gangs and other armed groups; HNP participation in kidnappings; overcrowding and poor sanitation in prisons; arbitrary threats and arrests; prolonged pretrial detention; an inefficient judiciary subject to significant influence by the executive and legislative branches; severe corruption in all branches of government; violence and societal discrimination against women; child abuse, internal trafficking of children, and child domestic labor; and ineffective enforcement of trade union organizing rights…. the government acknowledged the problem of internal trafficking, including that of children. The Brigade for the Protection of Minors (BPM), a branch of the Haiti National Police, investigated cases of child trafficking and monitored movement of children across the border with the Dominican Republic. However, in addition to the lack of specific penalties for trafficking, the lack of resources, training, and institutionalized procedures remained barriers to its operational capacity. There were so many street children in Port-au-Prince who were victims of domestic trafficking that the BPM did not as a matter of routine try to help them.

Non-governmental organizations were in the forefront in combating trafficking of children under the guise of international adoptions. On February 14, authorities arrested the operator of an orphanage and charged her with trafficking 32 children. On August 8, authorities in conjunction with two NGOs rescued 47 children from a rogue orphanage. Many of the children’s parents were unaware of the true activities of the orphanage. The orphanage remained open at year’s end.”

Also, “Child abuse was a problem. There was anecdotal evidence that in very poor families caretakers deprived the youngest children of food to feed older, income-generating children. In January 2006 a UN independent expert stated that 47 percent of sexual assaults involved minors as victims.”

From this American’s point of view, the most disturbing part of this is that almost no one is writing about it! Unless these ugly secrets become well known by Americans, not much will change. Most of the conservative press is focused on cleaning up our own economic and moral messes; the more ┬áliberal press seems to be focused on blaming Americans for whatever bad exists in the world.

When I contacted the Miami Herald recently, asking them to write about the problem of Haitians Hurting Haitians, I was told that due to the large Haitian population in Miami, they have to tread lightly and be careful what they write about. Apparently articles about poor hurting poor do not sell newspapers. But if I had a story of Haitians helping Haitians, or Americans hurting Haitians, they would be more than happy to write about it.